Japan

Japan

Japanese offshore bill faces delay

JAPAN: A decision on the country's new law for offshore wind has been delayed because it was not passed before the end of the most recent parliamentary session.

A 2MW turbine being tested at the Fukushima floating turbine pilot project off Japan's east coast
A 2MW turbine being tested at the Fukushima floating turbine pilot project off Japan's east coast

Japan’s Diet (parliament) closed on 22 July amid several government scandals and deadly floods in the west of the country, according to national newspaper the Asahi Shimbun.

It had passed 60 of the 65 laws before closing, and one of the five not to be approved before the 22 June deadline was the government’s draft bill on offshore wind.

The proposed law included designated construction zones for offshore wind capacity and 30-year occupation leases for developers, but was otherwise light on specific details.

It further required the prime minister to prepare a basic policy to promote offshore wind and the government to launch a consultation on the plan.

These measures have now been rejected and will have to be resubmitted for discussion at the next Diet session.

Prime minister Shinzo Abe determines the schedule, and the Japanese Wind Power Association (JWPA) advised that extraordinary sessions are normally held in the autumn (August to October), but a decision could also be deferred for up to a year.

JWPA added that it would request to make the law again at the next Diet session.

Japan has just 44.7MW of offshore wind currently installed, according to Windpower Intelligence, the research and data division of Windpower Monthly.

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